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Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund

FAQ

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Information for donors:

How many kids does the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund send to camp each summer?

Donors to the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund provided tuition scholarships for more than 225 children and teens who attended summer camp in 2016. This number does not fully convey the diverse set of camp settings they attended with overnight camp sessions between 5, 7, 26 and even 47 days long. Recipient camps also have different cost structures with varying tuition costs (or sliding-scale fees), different per-day or per-session costs, and different blends of funding for tuition support (often from non-profit parent organizations such as the Jewish Council for Youth Services, Easter Seal Society, United Way, and Boys and Girls Clubs).

The weekly tuition cost per-child at our recipient camps varies from $500 to $1,500 per week with an average cost per week of $740. Tuition costs are higher at camps that serve multiply disabled youth for whom a high staffing ratio and an investment in adaptive equipment and therapeutics is necessary. Such camps, for instance, help kids who use wheelchairs and feeding tubes enjoy a zip line or paddle in a canoe!

How can I help strengthen the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund’s effectiveness and fundraising capacity?

We welcome offers of pro bono assistance and expertise that help us strengthen our organizational effectiveness, outreach and fundraising professionalism. If you would like to support our efforts in any way above and beyond donations, we would love to hear from you! Please send an email to CNSFInfo@cncharities.org.

We are grateful to so many Nebagamon alumni who have helped the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund in countless ways. Special thanks for expert assistance offered by:

Dana (Gustafson) Regan who created our new logo

Hugh Broder of The Station who created our video

Matt Hoffman of HMS Media who provided footage for our video

Eric Kramer of East Troy Tax Service, LLC for many years of tax preparation services

Tom Mendelsohn of Mendelsohn, Gittleman & Associates, LLC for ongoing non-profit management guidance

Larry Rivkin of Rivkin & Rivkin, LLC for ongoing guidance

In addition to donating money to the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund, how can I help recipient camps?

We encourage Nebagamon alumni, campers, staff and friends to reach out to Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund recipient camps that are located near your home to explore opportunities to get involved as a volunteer. Many recipient camps provide programs year-round and have ongoing needs for mentoring, site upkeep, and after school/weekend programs. We would be delighted to see our Nebagamon community reach out in this way to make a difference in the lives of children and teens who experience poverty and disability. Please email us at CNSFInfo@cncharities.org to let us know if you have volunteered or would like to serve as a volunteer at a recipient camps. We’d like to hear what this experience has meant to you!

How is the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund different from Camperships for Nebagamon?

The Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund helps children and teens affected by poverty and disability to attend non-profit camps that specialize in meeting their needs. Donations support tuition scholarships at a select set of non-profit camps that offer therapeutic supports, adaptive recreation, and a focus on cultivating skills and values needed for success.

Founded by Muggs Lorber in 1947, the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund was administered by Nardie and Sally Lorber Stein for 50+ years.

Camperships For Nebagamon (CFN) helps youth attend private summer camp who could not otherwise do so: boys to Camp Nebagamon and girls to Camp WeHakee. CFN seeks not only to enrich the lives of these individual youth, but also to transform its partner camp communities through the benefits of greater diversity. Founded in 1995, CFN utilizes proceeds from the Muggs and Janet Lorber Endowment to help fund its Camp Nebagamon camperships. However, it depends upon annual donations for the majority of its funding each year.

Information for recipient camps:

How does the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund’s invitation-only application process work for its recipient camps?

In 2014, the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund initiated an annual, invitation-only application process.  Participating camps are invited in early January to complete a short questionnaire (and every four years are also asked to submit their most recent IRS form 990), all due by mid-February. Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund board members use this information to evaluate and select for funding a group of high-performing non-profit camps that demonstrate sound fiscal management and expertise in serving youth affected by poverty and/or disability.

What are the restrictions on funds received from the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund?

Funding is restricted to use for tuition scholarships only for children and teens who experience poverty or disability. Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund support may not be used for a camp or parent non-profit’s general operating fund, nor for capital improvements

How can recipient camps thank donors to the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund?

Great question! We encourage recipient camps to post photos and comments from campers, counselors and parents on our Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund Facebook page. This offers our donors and supporters a first-hand glimpse of the impact your camp is having on the lives of the children and teens you serve. In these Facebook postings, do not use photos of children, teens or counselors unless you have written permission to do so. Please also do not post the names of children and teens in these photo (or tag them) out of respect for their privacy. However, if they wish to tag themselves – with permission from their parents – that’s okay and we appreciate that you can’t prevent that. Should you wish to post comments on Facebook that your camp received from youth or parents, likewise, please do not identify the source of comments and insights about disability or life challenges – out of respect for the privacy of those individuals and families.

What is required for recipient camps to obtain continued funding?

The substance and timeliness of a camp’s response to the invitation-only application process is most important. Additionally, we evaluate the camp’s responsiveness to our annual request that after the summer camp season, recipient camps share three to five high-quality photos and three to five meaningful and substantive comments from campers, counselors or parents by mid-September. These images and quotes help us communicate to our donors the challenges that children and teens face due to poverty and disability and how camp has changed their lives for the better. This real-world feedback is the flywheel that fuels our fundraising efficacy.

How are new recipient camps selected?

To request consideration to participate in the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund’s invitation-only application process in the future, a camp must be a non-profit overnight summer camp that primarily serves children and teens who experience poverty and/or disability. It should be located in or near a community where Camp Nebagamon’s campers and alumni live.

The Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund board evaluates requests for future funding consideration at its fall board meeting. Please contact a board member in or near your community no later than September 1st if you seek funding consideration for a new camp. Consideration will only be given to camps that have some connection with Camp Nebagamon alumni, and ACA-accredited camps are preferred.

Please note that while a set of our recipient camps serve children and teens with intellectual and physical disabilities, at this time we are not able to provide tuition scholarship support to camps that primarily serve youth with health needs caused by ongoing illnesses or disease. We regret that we do not have sufficient funding to provide ongoing tuition supports for such worthy campers. Often such camps receive tuition support from medically-focused non-profits with their own fund-raising organizations.